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Security Center

The best line of defense against fraud begins with you.  Below you’ll find information and online resources to help keep your personal information and your money safe and secure. 

Unsolicited Calls/Email
Infuze Credit Union will never send messages (e-mail, phone or text) requesting your personal information, including card numbers, passwords or your PIN.  We also won't reach out to you via e-mail or text and request that you download a file.

If you receive a message that appears to come from Infuze Credit Union asking for your personal or confidential information, or to download a file – do not respond. Immediately contact us to report the incident.

Monitor Accounts & Utilize Alerts
Regularly monitor your credit union accounts for unauthorized transactions. Our easy-to-use alert system makes it easy to monitor your accounts, so fraud won’t go undetected. Inside Online or Mobile banking, click “Services & Settings,” and then click “Alerts” to explore the numerous types of alerts available.

Stay Informed
Subscribe to the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) Scam Alerts to receive an e-mail about what to watch out for when a new scam is becoming widespread.

 

 

Check Deposit Scam Tips

If a person you are unfamiliar with wants to pay you by check, cashier's check or money order and then requests you to wire a portion of the money back, beware! It’s a scam that could cost you thousands of dollars.
There are numerous counterfeit check scams that have been around for years. It could start with someone offering to buy an item you posted for sale, or pay you to work at home, or even give you an “advance” on a prize you’ve allegedly won.
The checks look real but are actually counterfeit. Remember, you are responsible for the checks deposited in your account. There is no legitimate reason for someone who is giving you money to ask you to wire money back. If a stranger wants to pay you for something, insist on a cashiers check for the exact amount, preferably from a local financial institution that has a branch in your area. Don’t ever provide your account information to them, and don’t deposit a check from someone you don’t expect. If it’s too good to be true, it probably is!
 

Tips for Recognizing E-mail Scams

Fraudulent e-mail messages are designed to mislead you into providing your personal and confidential information. You should be suspicious of any e-mail that requests your personal or account information.
Most businesses, including Infuze Credit Union, will never use an e-mail to ask you to provide or verify your personal or account information. If an e-mail asks for this type of information, presume it's fraudulent.
Many phishing e-mails try to deceive you with the threat that one of your accounts will be in danger if it’s not updated right away or that it has been compromised. An e-mail that urgently requests you to supply sensitive personal information is typically fraudulent.
Phishing e-mails have a link that looks valid but directs you to a fraudulent site that may or may not have an URL different from the link. Check where a link is going by moving your mouse over the link in the e-mail and looking at the URL in the bottom bar of the browser. If it looks suspicious, don't click it.
Lastly, fake e-mails often, but may not always, contain misspellings, poor grammar, missing words, and gaps in logic. These types of mistakes help scammers avoid spam filters. 
 

Mobile Payment Apps

Many consumers don't know that P2P payment services have limited, if any, fraud protection. Once the money is sent, it’s gone.
Peer-to-Peer (P2P) payment platforms — such as Zelle, Venmo, Apple Pay, Google Pay, Facebook Payments and Cash App — make it convenient to send someone money from your checking account. Be careful though, as scammers target these services and you will likely have difficulty getting your money back should you be defrauded.
 
 

Unique Passwords

Strong passwords are critical to prevent unauthorized access to your online accounts. Use a different password for each site (include symbols and numbers), and never reuse the same password on multiple financial sites. Then even if someone gains access to one account, the same credentials won't provide access to others.